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Edith Sitwell

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Edith Sitwell's image as used on merchandise, 1991

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Her image has been used as t-shirts, backdrops and tour programmes.
In her collection of essays: "The English Eccentrics" (1933), she writes:

‘O Health, Health, the blessing of the rich, 
the riches of the poor, 
Who can buy thee at too dear a rate, 
since there is no enjoying this world without thee.

This has been asserted by Simon Goddard et al as a possible influence on I Want The One I Can't Have's lyrics.

Discogs Information

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British poet and critic, born 7 September 1887 in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England, UK, died 9 December 1964 in London, England, UK. Sister of Osbert Sitwell.

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Wikipedia Information

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Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell (7 September 1887 – 9 December 1964) was a British poet and critic and the eldest of the three literary Sitwells. She reacted badly to her eccentric, unloving parents and lived much of her life with her governess. She never married but became passionately attached to Russian painter Pavel Tchelitchew, and her home was always open to London's poetic circle, to whom she was generous and helpful. Sitwell published poetry continuously from 1913, some of it abstract and set to music. With her dramatic style and exotic costumes, she was sometimes labelled a poseur, but her work was praised for its solid technique and painstaking craftsmanship. She was a recipient of the Benson Medal of the Royal Society of Literature.