The Morrissey-solo Wiki is a continual work in progress, most of the data still needs to be populated. See the To Do page if you want to help.

Pauline Kael

From Morrissey-solo Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Relevance

One of Morrissey's favourite 'symbolists' - via NME interview (1983):
[Morrissey - "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer"]


Mentioned In

Wikipedia Information

300px-Pauline_Kael_%281968%29.jpg

Pauline Kael (; June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine from 1968 to 1991. Known for her "witty, biting, highly opinionated and sharply focused" reviews, Kael's opinions often ran contrary to those of her contemporaries. One of the most influential American film critics of her era, she left a lasting impression on the art form. Roger Ebert argued in an obituary that Kael "had a more positive influence on the climate for film in America than any other single person over the last three decades." Kael, he said, "had no theory, no rules, no guidelines, no objective standards. You couldn't apply her 'approach' to a film. With her it was all personal." Owen Gleiberman said she "was more than a great critic. She reinvented the form, and pioneered an entire aesthetic of writing."